When you read books that challenge your worldview, you have to look at the evidence that is given and try to interpret it as it really is aside from the biases life has given you. You need to strive every day to push against your strongly held opinions of the world and form only those that have for you no value– those that if shown to be wrong can be changed.

No one likes a person who sits in the middle and chooses no side- but those who do sit in the middle have a far better understanding of the world around them. Look at your life, your surroundings. Do you see a future of fire? If it isn’t there, then maybe it isn’t everywhere else either. If everyone believes their own lives will improve, then don’t you think the lives of us all will gradually improve? And more importantly, how will you use your knowledge to help further the long-term progress?

These are the things you will consider while reading this book. I could go on about what it contains for fifteen or twenty more pages, but I think it’s best to leave off here and let you decide for yourself. If you choose to get this book- I have left links to it below, but it can be found anywhere as Steven Pinker is a well known intellectual.

Keep growing, my friends.

Economic illiteracy among leftists: Buturovic & Klein 2010; see also Caplan 2007

Economic illiteracy follow-up and retraction: Klein & Buturovic 2011

Featured image cred here.

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7 thoughts on “Steven Pinker’s Enlightenment Now: the Case for Reason, Science, Humanism, and Progress- In Reviewniverse

  1. Pinker’s always interesting to read. My introduction to him was through the background material for Literary Darwinism. He’s one of the key thinkers in Evolutionary Psychology. The more I read of his work, the more I wanted to read. Edward O. Wilson’s work is very compatible and the two thinkers often interact directly.

    1. I definitely get the same feeling reading his work. I had been skeptical of evolutionary psychology for quite some time before reading Pinker- came to him through linguistics actually. Never heard of Edward O. Wilson though- I’ll have to look him up!

      Thank you for reading and leaving a comment!!

      1. Another one to add to your list is Chris Boehm, an evolutionary anthropologist, and his book Moral Origins. Came across Boehm while reading Sebastian Junger’s book Tribe. Boehm’s work does a good job of showing the interrelation between evolutionary psychology and evolutionary biology, especially the nature vs nurture,/genes vs culture questions

      2. Oh that sounds like the perfect read- I’ve been having a lot of conversations lately about how we can interpret evolutionary psychology as something more than speculative. It would be nice to have some grounding in the field.

        Thank you for this. If you ever have authors you’d like to share, please send their names my way!

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